Knowledge Bird

Create. Curate. Collaborate.

March 4, 2014
by Aprill Allen
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Dear ITIL, it doesn’t have to be complicated

ZDguideDisclaimer: Most of my readers will know that I’m affiliated with Zendesk. Zendesk do pay me for content and consulting on ITSM and knowledge management stuff. This book review I’m about to do, which covers mapping Zendesk functionality to ITIL processes, has not been commissioned by Zendesk, nor endorsed by them. It is my objective opinion as an independent consultant.

A couple of weeks ago Crystal Taggart released a short guidebook to the Amazon Kindle store. This isn’t the first guidebook she’s released; there’s also a Quick Start Guide to using Axure 7 for rapid prototyping and 10 Secrets for Launching a Software Startup. Crystal describes herself as a technologist and entrepreneur who specialises in creating and implementing solutions that solve business problems. Her most recent book, a Zendesk Quickstart Guide is a step-by-step guide to mapping ITIL processes quickly and easily.

It’s no secret I’ve always liked Zendesk for how it looks, but I’m also a strong believer in their philosophy of “beautifully simple”. We have a tendency in IT operations to over-think things and sign off on expensive lifecycle solutions with All The Things where we’re likely to end up using only a fraction of the available capabilities. Crystal’s book describes an implementation of Zendesk that covers Incident, Problem, Change and Release to the requirements of her client. “The goal was to write a book that would take the reader 1 hour what took me 3 days (and 17 years of experience!) to do.” That’s a bit different from the months it can take to rollout a more complex solution.

She starts out by defining each of those processes and acknowledges that the set up she recommends made sense for this case, and that your mileage may vary depending on your own needs and circumstances.

Crystal maps ITIL terminology to the Zendesk ticket type terminology in the following way:

  • Incident = incident
  • Request for service = task
  • Request for information = question
  • Request for change (or enhancement request) = task
  • Change control = task
  • Problem (or defect) = problem

Tasks are used in place of incident tickets to allow for SLAs to be set up for different categories—a known issue vs an enhancement request, for example.

The book then goes through the step-by-step details on setting up groups that take ticket assignments and custom fields on tickets that feed macros, triggers, automations, and reporting for problem management. Crystal offers definitions for the different priorities of urgent, high, normal and low and designs automations accordingly.

After a brief explanation of how the Zendesk Help Centre can be used as an IT knowledge base, you can learn how to integrate Zapier to have change control notifications created to automatically populate a knowledge base article. This is a really clever, but kind of painful and complicated way of achieving something that should be able to happen natively. It’s the one significant bugbear I have with Zendesk—that knowledge creation is not a part of the native agent workflow, beyond searching for existing articles. The classic Zendesk forums, pre the launch of New Zendesk and the Help Centre, did have the functionality where you could create an article from a ticket with a single click, so I am confident that ability will return some day soon.

The book also provides a plan comparison, but do your own analysis there, because I’m not sure the details are completely accurate.

For not much more than $9, this is a great guidebook for any Zendesk administrator aspiring to meet some level of ITIL adherence in their organisation, or for any ITIL-aware organisation that is considering Zendesk. It’s a beautifully simple explanation (I only wish I’d written it), but it’s not the only way to approach it, so keep in mind that your workflows may change as your processes and organisation matures.

 

February 28, 2014
by Aprill Allen
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Pink14: was it worth it?

Pink14

I’ve heard more than once that the Pink Elephant conference was something to behold. And if I was only to go once in my lifetime, I wanted it to be this year with Canadian astronaut, Commander Hadfield, as the keynote. So, I ponied up with the outrageous fees that IT conferences can command and I’ve been asked, “was it worth it?”

As a fee-paying delegate, (rather than being there on a speaker ticket), my plan of attack was much different. With so many tracks and no lunch breaks, one really does need to have a plan of attack. I couldn’t just stroll around and visit what took my fancy at the time. I had my book and my highlighter and I had the four days mapped out. It came a little unstuck on day 3, but let’s not talk about that.

I can’t rattle off a few gems without first giving a nod to the Pinkers—the Pink Elephant consultants and staff. The annual conference at the Bellagio Hotel and Casino is just a feat of organisation. And it’s not just about the event. Each of those Pink consultants that I saw deliver presentations are outstanding speakers; Jack Probst, George Spalding, Troy du Moulin, to name just a few. They know their stuff and are true professionals.

Given my personal requirement to maximise ROI for a Pink ticket, I kicked off with a conference optimiser— Sunday afternoon tracks of pre-conference breakout sessions–to see the perennial Pink motivator Kirk Weisler. Everyone can use a good kick in the morale and Kirk’s message was a good reminder for me, as a self-employed consultant, to check in with my goals. Do the activities I do at work connect me to those goals? What about you?

A bit of fizzy rah-rah is a good way to start, but the meat is in the eleventy-billion sessions that Pink makes you choose from. (At least you can download all the session presentations for later consumption.) The Best Practices for Implementing an ITSM Tool was a lively panel discussion with speakers from Citrix GoToAssist, EasyVista, and Navvia. I was interested to hear the recommended practice with tool migration is to leave everything archived in a data warehouse and only bring across open tickets and other live data. But, as my good friend, Craig Wilkey from Attivio, pointed out—what about all that organisational learning now holed up in a bunker? Good point, sir! Perhaps the most interesting thing was the wave of discussion over social media that was provoked by David Mainville’s comment, “there IS no out of the box”. The old configuration vs customisation question.

There were industry activities involving think tanks and Axelos announcements—here’s a good rundown from Macanta—and and some well-deserving winners of awards. Oh, Attivio? Yeah, they won innovation of the year for their unified information access platform—that’s heartening for anyone who cares about knowledge management.

And what about the guy I’d come all this way to see? He did not disappoint. Talk about inspiring. Commander Chris Hadfield has been booked for the keynote well in advance, while he was still on the International Space Station. He shared his photography and experiences of living in space and learning from failure. The most significant message for us as IT people is, plan to fail. Because if you plan to fail, you’ll know exactly how to respond if it does. The whole room was mesmerised and when he finished singing Space Oddity at the conclusion of his talk, we all erupted with applause.

IMG_2424

So, was it worth it? Yes. Especially for the in-person connections that were made after having interacted with so many of these smart people online for a year or two.

Will you go next year?

Similar bat time, same bat channel, superheroes.

 

 

Other Pink14 blog posts here:

Rebecca Beach writing for the ITSM Review

Jon Reynolds (Cloud Sherpas)

Ian Aitchison (LANDESK)

Earl Begley from the University of Kentucky, writing for the ITSM Review

Chuck Darst for HP

James Finister (Tata Consultancy Services)

 

February 6, 2014
by Aprill Allen
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Document management that doesn’t suck

document-management

Props to @MylesCarrick for the title. He sparked a conversation on twitter this week with that sentiment. So, I’m wondering what you look for in a document management system.

Here’s a few things I can think of:

1. Some sort of built-in, configurable governance for file naming convention—A lot of the problem I have with document management systems is that people still name things randomly and folders are often filled with unrelated, random contents. Some guidance for naming convention that didn’t rely on verbal reinforcement would be ideal.

2. Files and folders default to public. Explicit exclusion for folders/files that must be private—One of the challenges of knowledge management is that, as an organisation, we don’t know what we know. Transparent file storage allows for discoverability when we’re searching for something. The current sharing models require us to explicitly ALLOW access, rather than explicitly DENY.

3. Semantic clustering and recommendation engines—Related to my last post about miscellany, I’d like to see a DMS that can offer us suggestions of similar documents based on keywords and phrases. Of course, this would be dependent on point 2, above.

Are you happy with your document management solution? What are the things you look for?