User-Centric IT: What it means to me and why I give a crap

User-centric IT

Let me level with you—great customer service doesn’t motivate me. Yes, I am a customer from time to time, but I really just want to transact and get the hell on with my day. Recently, a group of enterprise software providers formed a coalition with the goal of shifting the design of enterprise IT services to the user, rather than forcing the user (or the customer, or the employee, or whichever moniker you prefer) to adapt to the constraints thrust upon them.

I’ve worked in enterprise IT for 13 years and I’ve used lots of systems. Working in technical support and in network operations, I had 99 problems and the software I was trying to use every day to do my job shouldn’t have been one of them. Why shouldn’t I have nice looking software when I’m in the office? Why can’t I be offered the kind of user-experience of design-focused apps like this, this, or this? If you think looks and usability don’t matter, then I ask you, how many clicks does it take for your colleagues to be able to submit a request or incident? Do you have covert changes going on because your form is long and confusing?

I’m not motivated by customer happiness. Everything I do professionally is motivated by a desire to improve agent happiness. (Or advocate, or analyst, or whichever moniker you prefer.) Whether it’s through better knowledge management, simpler processes, or better software. I like to think I support the support. The people who DO the support are the people I think of when I talk about user-centric IT. Give them a better experience and the people turning to them for help will have a better experience, too.

I’m hanging out in the LinkedIn group. Find me there.

*Disclaimer: Zendesk are a coalition member and a client of mine.

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