Investing in mentoring: why it matters

I grew up in the family business of ticketwriting & screenprinting. I went to TAFE to learn foundational skills in calligraphy, brush lettering, and screenprinting, and I spent time in the workshop with my parents showing me how to apply those skills. I was able to build on that learned foundation and they were able to transfer the kind of knowledge that can only be gained from years of hands-on industry and organisation-specific experience, such as why certain decisions were made. Essentially, it was a period of apprenticeship.

Corporate life typically doesn’t work the same way. The closest I’ve experienced to that is double-jacking in a technical support contact centre, allowing me to listen in on calls and learn how to do the job. Peer learning is valuable but it’s targeted to transferring existing process, and you frequently move your pairing relationships around so you can learn multiple perspectives. Like I said, it is certainly valuable, but it doesn’t do what mentoring does. Mentoring allows for meaningful one-to-one knowledge sharing relationships to form and outlast any particular tactical goals there might be. More tacit knowledge is shared organically throughout the relationship, than what happens with peer learning and e-learning, as the mentee develops trust and the psychological safety they need to ask questions they may have otherwise kept to themselves. For the mentee they develop a depth of knowledge in their subject domain, and for the mentor, their sense of self-worth gets a boost and they learn more from the process of teaching someone else.

I’ve covered mentoring tech on this blog before, and I’m proud to announce my commitment to Mentorloop as an angel investor. Mentorloop takes the administration overhead of spreadsheets and emails and manual matching out of running a mentoring program, making this valuable knowledge sharing format much easier to adopt and manage. It intelligently matches mentors and mentees and offers guidance throughout the relationship to keep both parties on track.

Better human relationships at work aren’t just about a market differentiation from AI-based services, although that is significant strategic move, it’s also about enabling our journeys towards self-actualisation and connection to meaning and purpose. Great mentors help us get there.

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