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The book that changed my mind

I’ve talked about my preference for ordered taxonomies before. In another article, I even claimed that folksonomies weren’t scalable. Everything is Miscellaneous: The power of the new digital disorder, by David Weinberger may have just changed my mind. Published in 2007, the book isn’t new, but I came across it on a list of recommended reads for knowledge management.

Weinberger, co-author of the international bestseller The Cluetrain Manifesto,  has an easy-to-read conversational style. In Everything is Miscellaneous, he lays out humankind’s fixation for heirarchy across history. “ur knowledge of the world has assumed the shape of a tree because that knowledge has been shackled to the physical.”

From Aristotle to Apple and Amazon, the way we work with information and knowledge has changed. Apple freed our music libraries so we could order our music how we wanted. Amazon clusters books in as many ways as we can so that we may …

Service integration and knowledge management

It became pretty clear in 2013 that the service integration wave was building up. It was discussed at the conferences and it’s been covered in blogs. As more IT managers fold the point-solutions of today in with traditional vendors and legacy systems, it’s more balls in the air while you maintain happy user and customer relationships, design cohesive SLAs, and ensure you don’t underestimate your total cost of ownership, amongst a myriad of other things.

And what of the contribution of knowledge management? Your records of the who and how of escalation become more important when there’s more than one place to go—and that might be dependent on the system or the time of day or any other factor. Your goal with your users, of course, is to hide the stitches, and they don’t care who the various service providers are. They only care that the services are working as …

Redressing the balance: women in IT(Service Management)

If there was ever a time when gender bias should be on the table for discussion, it’s 2013. I recently answered a question on the Back2ITSM Facebook group about diversity in IT. This post includes much of what I said there, with a few extra bits.

I agree with the questioner that the appearance of quotas and affirmative action can create a sense of exclusion But, the inequality exists and without efforts in a number of areas, the tech industry at large will miss out on access to a pool of amazing talent. It won’t be solved with one single action. This goes right back to the beginnings of education and STEM classes. And human nature means we find comfort in being with like-minded folks. It’s not that surprising that guys dominate IT. The majority of school teachers and nurses are females, just to throw in a comparison.

Let’s fast …

When an icebreaker isn’t just an icebreaker

I was invited to present a workshop as a guest speaker for a team off-site, recently. It was an express introduction to knowledge management and the group I presented to were enthusiastic about knowledge, even though they hadn’t yet implemented any KM programs. This particular group of people are managers in different roles across the IT operations team. There are a couple of challenges for them to work with: their team is distributed around the country, and they work in a traditional industry that could be subject to fallout from an ageing workforce.

When I do a knowledge management workshop, I like to start by getting everyone’s name and job title. There’s nothing new in that, and it’s more helpful to me than them, especially when they already know each other.
But I also keep three columns of numbers.

The first is how long each person has had that specific role; the …

How to interview your experts

Today’s post comes from Michael Domanski and Sean Murphy. Michael is a software developer and Sean is an entrepreneur with a history of business development and customer support. Together, they are bringing tools for knowledge management to small teams. Learn more about Knowledge Flow.

What’s the most unnerving thought when interviewing a high profile expert?
Just imagine how depressed you would be after securing an interview with a subject matter expert and then conducting an interview that is a mix of stuttering and banal questions. I had tons of angst myself when I started conducting interviews. It’s not easy to interview an expert, mainly
because of the depth of their knowledge. It gets even harder when you realize just how precious their time is. To make my experience even more stressful, I knew at some point some of those people may become my
customers. Thus, I not only needed information, I also needed to make it look as if I knew what I was doing.
Since there’s little information (very little) about this subject on the internet, I decided it may be a good thing to share
some lessons learned. Let’s jump in.

8 tips to guide you through interviewing your experts

1. Research the subject matter and people you want to contact
Your interview always should have a main subject. E.g. if you were to talk to a SEO expert on the matter of recent
changes to Google algorithms, research as much as possible on your own. This background will enable you to
ask questions that are informing to your readers and provide new or niche insight into the subject. Also, pay
attention to the background of the person you interview. Ideally you want to have a list of people to interview that you
have almost personal relation to.

2. Rules of engagement
I usually contact people via email. It’s almost a given that experts get a ton of email every dail. At this stage you
should know them well enough to write an email that will interest them enough to contact you back. If you don’t
think you can write a good email, read “Writing that works” by Kenneth Roman (make sure it’s the 3rd edition). Do
write a personal email, e.g. when I wrote to Adii Pienaar from WooThemes, I’ve included a small personal hook,
which got a brief discussion over email and a comment: “Nice email, got my attention”.

3. Draft an interview agenda
You know the subject, you know the person you’re going to interview. Now, with your target length of time for the
interview in mind, draft an agenda of the key items that you want to discuss. I usually write it and then review it with
my co-­interviewer. We discuss it and then send it to the interviewee in advance so that they can prepare. My advice
is to always have someone have a look at it.

4. Have a co-­interviewer
The main reasons I can think of for having help is:

Fluidity. If you are out of questions for the moment he can take it from there.
Notes. I added tip on taking notes and having help makes it much easier. One of you asks the
questions, one analyzes the answers and takes notes.
Brief and debrief. You can discuss the agenda and discuss what you have learned.

5. Prepare the environment
There are two types of settings for an interview. First type is “in person’ interview. It has the obvious benefit of you seeing the person you’re talking to. This gives you more clues about the feelings someone can have about the subject. On the other hand, those types of
interviews are expensive. They require you to secure a proper space and time to get there. You should never do an
interview in a space not private enough. I personally don’t believe in “coffee shop” interviews. The list of
distractions in such places is very long and you want the undivided attention of the person you’re asking questions.
Second type is the remote interview. Skype and gotomeeting are two most used tools for this kind of interviews.
While the interview can be much harder, ­­you can only hear the other person and see facial expressions or body
language­­, it has some logistic advantages. The whole setup is dirt cheap and the time spent on getting there is exactly 0 seconds. It’s also very useful when interviewing people over long distances.

6. Take notes
Take note of key words and phrases that your interviewee uses and pay attention to any term they repeat. Try to
write down things as they’re being said. You can draw your conclusions later. This is easier if you work with a
partner. ­That way, you won’t have to worry about losing the thread of conversation (believe me, it’s hard to take good
notes and follow the conversation at the same time, pay attention to how a good lecturer structures their
presentations).

7. Keep it on course
If you said the interview is going to take 30 minutes, be ready to end a few minutes before. A good guide is the
subject’s energy and engagement. If they seem happy, you can go over the promised time. If they’re showing fatigue,
try to wrap soon. It’s important to avoid data overload. ­If you ask too many questions, it can be hard to process them coherently. Having a planned agenda, with some questions and a general thread of thought will help you a lot.

8. Summarize
In case you got something wrong, at the end of the interview be ready to show or read a short summary to your
subject. While this is not as good as a thought-out follow up, it gives you the confidence, that at a high level, you
have the same view of the problem as the expert you’re interviewing. This is the end of the interview, but this is not the end for you and your partner. After the interview you debrief on the
situation, what you have learned and what you think is important to take note of. I also try to mention any
conclusions that seem obvious to me and that I drew based on the interview.

After the debrief I work on the formal summary of the interview. This may seem like a lot of work (and it is) but it’s
very significant since:

it enables you to confirm your conclusions with the expert
it makes you think hard to create a coherent picture and wrap it into words

Personally, I believe this is a step you should never omit. Even if you eventually end up not using what you have
learned, you will have a good notion of why it’s not useful. You will also be able to follow up with your subject and, if
you collaborate on it with your partner, you’ll be confident you haven’t overlooked obviously important information.
Fear of missing important information or the nuance of an insight are two reasons why I always email the
summary to the interviewee. Most experts are used to not being understood completely right away. Because of that,
most of them will read and correct what you got wrong. This is very similar to taking an exam and submitting your
answer. It’s crucial to perform this step, since you are going to base your action, or lack of it, on the conclusions
you deduced from the interview.

If you’d like to read more about conducting interviews, I recommend starting with this blog post. Having that in
mind, the set of rules outlined above is solid enough to get you through most interviews with very good results.­ I’ve been
using it now for two years, and it’s been tested by Sean (for a much longer period of time). Yet we’re still
curious what you think of it, so don’t hesitate to send us your feeedback.
­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

It takes a village

If you only knew what you already know is the tagline for recently launched Klever, short for Knowledge Lever. When I first heard noises about Klever, I didn’t know what to expect. I thought it might be some sort of tool-agnostic middleware for the enterprise. When they opened for early adopters I still wasn’t sure, so I paid the joining fee out of sheer curiosity. I’ve since poked around and had several conversations with the founders and have an understanding of their mission and plans. Allow me to explain for you, because being in a beta phase, the site and messaging is still being iterated on.

Klever’s goal is to offer Knowledge Centred Support and general KM resources and practices to all organisations large or small; public, private, or non-profit. Not everyone can afford an expensive consultant, but everyone deserves the capability of accessing their own organisational learnings. It’s a …

LeadIT13 conference wrap

My annual working-holiday is over for another year, with the conclusion of the itSMF’s LeadIT conference, held in Canberra. With the Under New Management sign still hanging above the Australian chapter, the event went off without a hitch and there’s a renewed sense of interest in what the itSMF can do to reach more members. New business manager, Bruce Harvey, is intending to get out and about to speak to all committee members, so I look forward to giving my two cents whenever that comes around.

Canberra were wonderful hosts for the conference and all the volunteers worked tirelessly over the three or four days to ensure all our sessions ran smoothly.

One can’t help but notice the common themes that tend to crop up through the content of any conference. LeadIT13’s overarching theme was service management in a connected world, but there was an undercurrent of disruption. While the …

When documentation is against the religion

Last week’s KM Australia congress in Sydney had a different vibe to last year. (Here’s the storify.) There were quite a few different faces from 2012, a few of the same ones, the weather was better. The room configuration was different, and maybe that’s all it was, but a small part of me thinks it was because one of the presenters was a chief technology officer. At last! A knowledge management case study from an IT executive.

James King started by explaining the nature of his organisation and the DevOps environment that his team works within. Of course, the Agile Manifesto says developers value “working software over comprehensive documentation”, and that’s where James got the first objection to his plan for better documentation to avoid rework. His response was that the Agile Manifesto is a piece of documentation in itself, so clearly, some documentation has value.

And so, the story continued …

Why You Should Crowdsource Your Help Desk Response

Today’s post is a guest post from Ashley Verrill—Ashley Verrill has spent the last six years reporting and writing business news and strategy features. Her work has been featured or cited in Inc., Forbes, Business Insider, GigaOM, CIO.com, Yahoo News, the Upstart Business Journal, the Austin Business Journal and the North Bay Business Journal, among others. She also produces original research-based reports and video content with industry experts and thought leaders.

 

Recently, I wrote an article for GigaOM about customer service software that doesn’t exist, but that I think someone should make. I argued basically that companies need technology for crowdsourcing their response to customer service questions on social media in order to scale, reasoning that in some cases it can be more efficient and cost-effective than paying for additional social media manpower.

After chatting with Aprill (the Knowledge Bird herself), I realized that business-to-customer support on social media isn’t the …

Change management and knowledge management holding each other’s hand

Jeanette Allom-Hill is the Change Leadership Director for the NSW State Treasury. She’ll be presenting Change Mangement—KM’s symbiotic partner or alter ego? at July’s KM Australia Congress. I spoke to her recently about her role in the NSW state government, and from our conversation, I’m sure she’ll have loads of fascinating stories about change management in the workplace.

1. As the change leadership director of the NSW Treasury, what are your day-to-day responsibilities and what sort of change projects do you oversee?
There is a change of leadership project which is about building a competency of our leaders and that’s an executive level project, which includes having done a change competency review on all of our leaders and looking at how we get them to be great change leaders, so we have road maps for each of them around, acting as visible leadership, communication, building a coalition, all the key components …