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ITIL as Dr Seuss: A challenge

One of our biggest challenges in service management is explaining what it is and why it’s useful. The ITIL definition is dry and completely unsellable.
A set of specialised organisational capabilities for providing value to customers in the form of services.
It’s a problem ITIL has more broadly—it’s dry and bureaucratic in its worst form. It’s …

A Request For Change…To Change

I’ve spent the holiday period going over the Change Management process in the 2011 ITIL® Service Transition book. I know! It’s fun isn’t it?! Anyway, I remarked on Twitter that the definitions for the types of change requests (4.2.4.3) is rather confusing. Here’s the excerpt in question (from page 65 of the digital edition):
There are three different types of service change:

Standard change A pre-authorised change that is low risk, relatively common, and follows a procedure or work instruction.
Emergency change A change that must be implemented as soon as possible, for example to resolve a major incident, or implement a security patch.
Normal change Any service change that is not a standard change or an emergency change.

It’s also worth noting that a standard change would not require a change request form to be filled out, as the term “pre-authorised” alludes to.

ITIL v3 Foundation Course—My Thoughts

Thanks to the HDAA, the Knowledge Bird went to Sydney last week for the three day foundation course in ITIL v3. They were kind enough to bestow a free course on me, having won the White Paper of the Year, at this year’s Australian itSMF conference.

Who knew such dry material could be so fascinating?